Physical practice is an aspect, and as such should not be weighted too heavily. If you are unsure of this separation, simply as yourself the question: “if I had no physical practice at all, would I still have a movement practice?

An individual’s deliberate and consistent effort to develop specific motor skills and patterns or general physical experience in adherence to a given objective context and/or subjective effort. Whilst most easily associated with sports and disciplines, physical practice is ultimately directed and defined at the discretion of the individual.

Physical practice is often most clear in disciplines whose desired output directly reflects (or is in some cases synonymous with) that practice. The physical practice is both of and for itself: consider the dancing of a dancer, the boxing of a boxer, the surfing of a surfer, the climbing of a climber, the lifting of a weightlifter. The physical practice highly reflects their discipline.

In other cases, the physical practice is simply a support for or facilitator of the discipline. In terms of ‘a support for’: a dancer, surfer, or climber may use weight-training as part of their physical practice, but the weight training is not of and for itself. Its function is to support their discipline at large. In terms of ‘a facilitator of’: consider the bodybuilder whose practice, although largely characterised by resistance training, is simply a facilitator for muscular hypertrophy.

Moving into more grey areas, the physical practice of a guitar player can be characterised by finger independence & coordination, tactile sensitivity, timing & rhythmicality, however the physical practice does not characterise the goal: the goal is to play good music, not simply train these individual attributes. A chef practices a variety of movement patterns which continually improve with practice, however the goal is not to become better at wielding a knife or working with edibles, but rather to cook creative and good tasting food.

In order to define more intently, I propose that ‘physical practice’ is highly determined by the context and efforts of the individual. I might enjoy walking for long distances and consider this nothing more than a pleasure, whereas another might define this as the physical practice of a hiker. I may be paid to lift heavy weights and exert a lot of energy as part of my job – another person will pay to lift heavy weights and exert a lot of energy and define it as their physical practice.

Consider these viewpoints carefully when positioning physical practice in relation to a ‘Movement Practice’. Physical practice is an aspect, and as such should not be weighted too heavily. If you are unsure of this separation, simply as yourself the question: “if I had no physical practice at all, would I still have a movement practice? If the answer is no, then you are perhaps too heavily invested in physical practice and could benefit from dedicating time to explore other movement aspects such as music, travel, cooking, or social relationships.

This should be reflected on deeply.